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Students of Industrial Revolution-era history may well be familiar with the name Henry Maudslay. Amongst his many achievements, probably the most significant was his screw-cutting lathe, which he built as the eighteenth century turned into the nineteenth, and which cut standardised, repeatable threads into bolts and nuts. Prior to that, most bolts and screws had hand-cut threads, so no two were exactly the same – can you imagine…?

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UNIQ Furniture

The concept of making old things new is not a recent one, we have attempted to preserve, restore and provide longevity too many items for centuries. We have all heard of the “Make do and Mend” slogan from the Second World War pamphlet of the same name, providing handy tips to the nation’s Housewives on ways to be frugal in the hard times of rationing.

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Crestow House Hotel

This is the 17th article in the series that began in 2017, providing our readers with a recommendation of places to stay offering outstanding high quality accommodation along with safe parking for your Morgans when visiting the Morgan factory in Malvern, Worcestershire. Last but certainly not least, is Crestow House, a truly exceptional place to stay.

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Aviation Leathercraft

When I was young, well, when I was younger, a good Mate of ours, we’ll call him Dave for the purpose of this article, owned a Triumph Spitfire. Dave’s Spitfire was the envy of many a young buck, add to this that Dave was also the figure of many a young belle’s desire, due to his Spitfire I suspect, and you can see that our Dave was quite the boy about town.

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Sunbeam

John Marston was born into a well-to-do landowning family in Ludlow, Shropshire, in 1836. At the age of 15, he went to Wolverhampton, where he served his apprenticeship at Edward Perry’s tinplating and japanware outfit. At 23, he left Perry to set up on his own, buying a factory in nearby Bilston, and did so well that, when Perry died in 1869, Marston took over Perry’s factory too.

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Eckington Manor

Eckington Manor is an award winning hotel and venue nestled in the beautiful Avon valley, near Pershore, Worcestershire, and is a rather special place. Founded by Judy Gardner, of Garner’s Foods fame, which specialises in pickles and dressings, Judy believes that life doesn’t get much better than good food in a relaxed, enjoyable atmosphere.

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News Issue 88

The Company now employs a record 233 staff. Thanks to the recruitment drive, over 40 new roles have been created so far this year, and there are currently 10 open job vacancies across various departments and levels of the business, including a number of new senior roles. After starting 2019 with 204 employees, the company projects a workforce of 240 by the end of the year.

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The Malvern Spa

Sister hotel to the Colwall Park Hotel which we have featured in a previous edition, the Malvern Spa is quite different in that it is a modern hotel sited on the edge of town with a superb health and leisure spa as the central focus to its being. In fact it is the first spa to open in Malvern since 1910, and it was back in 1842 that the very first spa opened with Doctors James Manby Gulley and James Wilson offering what was referred to as the “Water Cure” and putting Malvern on the map as a spa town and a popular destination.

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Rover

It all began when the bicycle was king. James Starley was well known for making sewing machines but, in 1869, made the transfer into the bicycle trade. One of his employees was his nephew, John K Starley, who left his uncle’s company, joined forces with William Sutton and founded Starley & Sutton Co in Coventry in 1878. The first vehicle to carry the Rover name was a tricycle, launched in 1883.

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News Issue 87

If you missed out on a 110 anniversary car, fear not as there is one last chance to join the celebrations as Morgan Motor Company and Pashley Cycles have launched the Pashley-Morgan 110 Limited Edition bicycle. The companies’ design teams have worked together to create a unique bike that marks a fitting tribute to this significant anniversary.

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Lanchester

Born in 1868 in south London, the middle of eight children, Fred was a gifted scientist and engineer, and won a scholarship to the Royal College of Science. At the age of 21, he joined the Forward Gas Engine Company in Birmingham, where he made some very successful refinements to the company’s engines, and, in 1892, resigned to try to sell his gas engine patents in America. This wasn’t successful – mains gas was expensive in the US, and rare outside major cities – so he came home, set up his own workshop and did subcontract work for various companies, including Forward.

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